Challenge #36: Give up your seat

While using a public transport give up your seat to those who need it more. 

give away your seat

“It is very important to give back as a youth. It’s as simple as helping an old lady cross the street or giving up your seat on the bus for someone who is pregnant.”

-Queen Latifah

Hey, guys!

Like usually, nothing complicated this week. Next time you’ll be using a public transport pay some extra attention to other passengers. If you spot anyone you think might use a seat more than you do, kindly offer them yours. This goes especially for seniors, pregnant ladies, and parents with small babies. For them, standing while using a public transit can be really dangerous and exhausting.

This challenge can also be performed while using any other public seat.

Let’s say you and your friends are seating on a bench in a park. There is no extra room on that bench and there aren’t any other benches available in that area. Then you see two seniors slowly approaching you. That is the time to stand up and offer them your bench.

You get the picture, right. Giving up your seat once counts as completing this week’s challenge. But we urge you to try and make a habit out of this nice gesture.

Public seat

In our sixth challenge, we talked about a random act of kindness in quite some details (you can read more about it here). This challenge most definitely counts as one. What this means, you won’t only give someone a chance to sit down and relax but you’ll also make someone’s day a bit nicer. You’ll show them that there are still kind and thoughtful people around.

Like always, do the best you can.

Public transportation facts
  • To get a better understanding why this challenge is very important, we’ll take a look at some fact and statistics regarding public transportation. You’ll see there are many many many people using public transit on daily basis.
  • Americans take a bit shy of 11 billion trips on public transportation each year.
  • Public transportation employs around 400,000 people in the US alone.
  • People board public transportation 35 million times each weekday.
  • Public transportation is a $58 billion industry.
  • Residential property values perform over 40 percent better if they are located near public transportation with high-frequency services.
  • Congestion cost would have been an additional $21 billion without public transportation.
  • On average, a household can save over $10,000 by taking public transportation and reducing the number of cars (one car less).
Take-home points:
  • Give up your seat while using public transit.
  • Give up your seat to those who need it more – seniors, pregnant ladies, and parents with small children come first.
  • Give up your seat when using any public seat (in a park, on a bus station, etc.).

Have a lovely week. Be kind. 😉

Love,

Good Earthlings

4 comments

  1. J.R. says:

    I haven’t used public transportation in some time but when I was in college, I rode the bus everyday. I would always be frustrated by the young guy taking up a seat when a mother with two young kids was standing right next to him!! Like your site says, just be a good earthling!! Giving up your seat makes the person you’re giving it up for feel good cause of the gesture which in return will make you feel good knowing you did the right thing.

    • Good Earthling says:

      Hi, JR!

      Thank you for sharing your opinion with us.

      Have a great day.

    • Kenny Lee says:

      This is a very meaningful challenge. It’s been ages since I last took a public transport, but I never have one instance of occupying seats for elderly or pregnant mums. I’ve seen cases where selfish passenger would just ignore the signs. That really pisses me off. I’m not sure if enforcing laws that penalize those that doesn’t give up their seat would be a good measure?

      • Good Earthling says:

        Hey, there!

        We think enforcing that kind of a law wouldn’t be such a bad idea. However, unfortunately being a douchebag is not a crime … :S 🙂

        Stay in touch!

        Warm regards,

        GE

        Leave a Reply